Managing Day-to-Day Stress

Posted: August 23, 2014 in depression, life coach, money, single parenting, stress, support, work

Your alarm goes off.  You hit the button and look at the clock.  It’s 6:00 AM and Tuesday.  The first thing that hits your mind before your feet hit the floor is that you have a 1/4 tank of gas left.  You walk into the bathroom trying to wipe the sleep from your eyes.  You look in the mirror only to have your focus disrupted when your child reminds you of a field trip on Thursday.  She will need $10 for the trip.

You say, “okay” and now try to figure out what you need to do to accommodate that $10 for the field trip.  At the same time, you’re trying to coordinate all of your errands on your way to work so that you can take care of it all in one trip and save gas.

You finally get dressed, grab a bite to eat for breakfast and head out the door.  As you watch your kid board the bus, you turn around and look at your car only to see that your back, left tire is on a flat.  You’re almost brought to tears as you pop the trunk to get the spare.

Thirty minutes later the tire is changed and you’re on your way to work a few minutes late.  Now you have to get your tire fixed on top of the $10 for the field trip and having to make it until Friday on 1/4 tank of gas.  You’re going to skip lunch today because that’s where your daughter’s $10 for her trip will come from.

You get to work and your trifling coworker has been slacking and causing you more work.  You can’t say anything to him because his uncle is the boss at your branch.  He pretty much has a lifetime immunity at the job despite the fact that he’s non-productive.  You have to smile and deal with his shenanigans.  

After a full day of work, you’re hungry due to skipping lunch, but it’s only three minutes until quitting time.  Your day is almost over!  But, your desk phone rings.  It’s an irate client and he keeps you on the phone for an additional 30 minutes after quitting time.

You finish up at work and finally head home.  Traffic is bad, but it gives you an opportunity to figure out a game plan for dinner.  Is there enough in the refrigerator to generate a decent meal or will you need to stop by the store?  You decide to head on home and cook what’s there.  You’ve made something out of nothing before.

You arrive home, cook, eat, and finally sit down for the evening.  It’s 7:30 PM and you just want to watch some TV and unwind until your daughter comes in the room with that look she gives when she’s in trouble.  Her science project is due tomorrow and she needs some supplies from Office Depot.

You do everything within your power to not curse as you grab your shoes and keys to take her to the store.  You’ve told her time-and-time again not to wait until the last minute, but she’s a kid.  That’s what they do.  If you only had a spouse to help manage things it would be so much easier.  But, it’s just you and your daughter.

After coming back from Office Depot and spending $27 that you really didn’t have, you start her on the project and eventually make your way towards the bedroom.  It’s almost 9 PM and you’re exhausted.  You plop on the bed and before you know it, you’re out like a light…

Your alarm goes off.  You hit the button and look at the clock.  It’s 6:00 AM and Wednesday.  The first thing that hits your mind before your feet hit the floor is that you have less than a 1/4 tank of gas left.  You walk into the bathroom trying to wipe the sleep from your eyes.  You look in the mirror only to have your focus disrupted when your child reminds you of a field trip tomorrow.  You give her $10 for the trip.

You now try to figure out what you need to do to compensate for the $27 you spent on that Office Depot visit you made last night.  At the same time, you’re trying to coordinate all of your errands on your way to work so that you can take care of it all in one trip and save gas

You finally get dressed, grab a bite to eat for breakfast and head out the door.  As you watch your kid board the bus, you turn around and look at your car only to see that spare tire still on the back, left of your car and it’s two more days until pay day. 

Some people live a life very similar to this.  Every day is a new struggle as they wake up to take on the world.  There’s not enough money being paid on jobs and corporate greed is slowly strangling a lot of American citizens.  Married couples and co-parenting appear to be a dying breed.  So, one person is taking on so much responsibility when it comes to raising kids.  Simple things like school projects, gas, car maintenance, awful co-workers, or even sitting in traffic all build pressure within our minds.

If we don’t find a way to release the pressure, then our heads will explode.  You can release that pressure by having a hobby.  Read a book, play an instrument, paint, jog, go fishing see a movie, whatever.  If that’s not enough then talk to a friend to vent a little.

And if push comes to shove then absolutely do not hesitate to speak to someone qualified to help you find ways to reduce that stress.  Call (888) 866-7561 to reach the 24 hour stress counseling support line at CrisisSupport.org.  E-mail counselor and a friend of mine, Brandy J. Flynn, if you want more of a personal touch.  Talk to a life coach like Veronica Cuyugan to help prioritize your life if that’s what is needed.

The bottom line is this: if you don’t find a way to release that pressure then it will consume you.  I guarantee you that it will.  Seeking help is not a sign of weakness.  It’s a sign of strength.  What’s more embarrassing: losing your mind at work and curling up in the fetal position under your desk or speaking to someone in confidence who can help you roll with the punches until you get back on your feet?

Think about it, but don’t take too long.  It’s not a hard decision.  No one should have to live the above story everyday like a bad “Groundhog Day” sequel.  Take charge of your life by finding a way to free your mind.

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