Are Online Job Sites A Sham?

Posted: June 10, 2014 in corporate greed, corporations, education, jobs, work

Something just isn’t right about the job market.  There’s something extremely different about it now in comparison to 5+ years ago that’s not sitting well with me.

I lost my full-time job of five years back in January 2013.  It was the best job I’d ever had in regards to the pay and the people I worked with daily.  I had a cool, yet effective, boss and some of the greatest co-workers a guy could ask for on any job.  However, a “financial decision” was made and 50 people lost their jobs.  Two months later we all got to read about the CEO of our company getting a $29.9 million dollar compensation (up 37% from the previous year).  He could have paid everyone in my office $100,000 a year for two years and still had roughly $20 million left over.
But, that’s not my gripe (although I felt the need to mention it – LOL).  I don’t think that anyone should be required to share their money.  But, I do think that it’s morally wrong to take food off of people’s tables so that you can turn $13 million into $30 million.  But what does this country care about morals anyway?  That’s a blog post for another day.
I’m wondering about the job market itself and how employment rates are down yet opportunities are still not there.  When I searched for a new job I found so many openings, for which I was qualified, on multiple websites.  According to the e-mails that I saved with each online application, I applied for over 200 jobs in a three month period and only received five phone interviews and three in-office interviews.  This doesn’t even include the times in which I applied for jobs in-person. 
How could there be so many listings yet so few responses?
After the first 50 or so non-responses to my online applications, I got some help from a friend and changed up my resume.  I did get my first phone call after doing that, but it was just that.  A phone call.  I continued to fill out applications on multiple sites and not get any responses aside from generic auto-emails.
I’ve never had a problem getting jobs in my life until last year.  Since January 2013, I’ve only had one company contact me about a job doing in what I’m most experienced in.  I didn’t even reach out to them.  They contacted me!  Unfortunately for me that job was in South Carolina and I had no desire to move.  Luckily, I finally had someone give me an opportunity to work for them, but wasn’t in the field of my previous experience.  
What are these online sites doing?  They’re supposed to make it easier for people to get a job.  It’s one thing to be turned down after an interview, but to not even get an interview?  I’m not bragging, but my resume isn’t all that bad.  I have a wealth of experience in a lot of different fields.  I’ve been promoted in three of the last four full-time jobs in which I’ve had.  I’ve received performance bonuses at every single full-time job I’ve had since 1995.  Every one.  I’ve only missed work on my full-time jobs on two occasions since 2002 aside from three bereavement leaves (grandmother, mother, wife): when my late wife found out she had been diagnosed with breast cancer (2002) and when I had tore my patella tendon and required surgery (2011).  So, I’m efficient and reliable.
Are online job sites a scam?  Are they marketing your information to other sites and quick-fix educational institutions?  I don’t have an answer and maybe some of you out there can shed some light on the subject.  I’m starting to think that the reason there are so many job sites online is because very few of them are on the up-and-up.
Do you think that online jobsites like Monster, Indeed, or CareerBuilder are scams?
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Comments
  1. dopdavid says:

    I don't have an answer to if job sites are scams or not. But I do know that online job sites are businesses too, so I imagine they are not too critical of job postings that employers post on their websites. It would be bad for their business to show few job postings or to chase away potential employers posting jobs on the website because of stiff reviews and strict requirements. It would be equally bad to have false job offerings, but in some ways they could place the burden of responsibility upon the employers using the website, while appearing to have plenty of legit jobs. I do have to say that I see more commercials and advertisements for these websites than I have heard of people finding jobs through them, just a thought.

  2. Thank Q says:

    Great comment! I think you said it all when you reminded me that they are a business, too!

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