In The Year 2100, Blacks Will Only Be Seen in Museums

Posted: December 9, 2013 in african-american, black, civil rights, communities, mandela, mlk, school, violence

I know that the title is unsettling.  I heard my father say that recently. He said that at the rate black people are destroying their communities, that 100 years from now we won’t even exist.  Think about that for a second. That’s a strong statement!

If you’re not black, then you may feel uncomfortable agreeing with that thought or speaking on it. If you are black, then you should feel uncomfortable in knowing that although it may not be true, you can understand the concept.

Here in Jackson, MS, a 15 year old girl was shot outside of Wingfield High School after a fight. She died later at the hospital from a gun shot wound to the chest. Shortly after this tragedy occurred, videos surfaced showing multiple fights at that high school from this year and last year. At least eight videos ranging from classroom brawls to outside gatherings.

Kids fighting is nothing new.  It happened when I was in school, too.  I think that the difference is today is that it’s glorified on an entirely new level in 2013.  Teachers no longer have control over classrooms due to the policies put in place that restricts them.  Parents have no control over kids at home because most of them are either single parents or too immature to be a parent.

So, if kids are steadily engaging in acts of violence and parents don’t know how to guide them to behave like human beings, then why shouldn’t my father feel the way that he does?

Nelson Mandela just passed away a few days ago.  He represented something we may never see in any leader, regardless of color, again: restraint.  Mandela could have easily lashed out against white people for putting him in jail for almost 30 years.  But, he decided that it wasn’t worth it.  He spent the remaining years of his life trying to install peace into society instead of the opposite.  Sometimes your worst enemy will learn to love you if you show compassion.

For every Mandela, there seem to be 10,000 non-Mandelas born each day.  Black people who just don’t believe in leaving the world in a better place than how they found it.  My generation (70’s babies) were the cause of that.  We were the generation that decided that we would allow our kids certain freedoms that our parents wouldn’t allow us.  Now we have a generation of kids who only want what they want regardless of the end result.

It’s that mentality that makes being violent feel like option number one instead of a last resort.  It makes taking care of your kids seem like a burden instead of a responsibility.  It makes dating the opposite sex seem like a game instead of an opportunity to find someone to share your life.

How can a race of people possibly survive against those odds?  Maybe my father was right.  Neither one of us will be here to verify in the year 2100, but maybe this blog post will serve as notice to those who will.

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Comments
  1. Vinny C says:

    The odds are bad now, but can you imagine what it will be like for the next generation? I think the reality of a future where things continue on their current is scarier than any sci-fi horror movie.

  2. Thank Q says:

    I agree. It's gone from bad-to-worse. And it's all happened in a generation and a half. MLK just died 60 years ago. My grandmother has seen it go from bad, to good, to bad all over again in her 90 years. Seeing a black president was supposed to be the pinnacle of her life in regards to black history, but it means nothing in the grand scheme of things.

  3. I often wonder if the human species will be around in ANY form in the next hundred years. Seems like there are so many rotten people trying to ruin the planet, and each other, that we have no hope of overcoming extinction. Stupidity knows no color, that's for certain. Laziness, greed, and a severe lack of empathy all fall under that category, IMO.

  4. Thank Q says:

    That's a great point. We're all destructive. With snow in Egypt and crazy weather patterns, it does make you wonder what life will be like just 25 years from now. Thanks for stopping in!

  5. Debra Cole says:

    Really interesting, provocative and thoughtful piece, thank you for sharing.

  6. Thank Q says:

    Thank you for visiting and chiming in, Debra!

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